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Hikers enjoy a a full bloom Spring in a field of lupin (lupine) at  the 162 acre Van Hoosear Wildflower Preserve at the base of Sonoma Mountain in Sonoma, during a group wildflower walk. Press Democrat file

Hikers enjoy a a full bloom spring in a field of lupin (lupine) at the 162-acre Van Hoosear Wildflower Preserve at the base of Sonoma Mountain in Sonoma. (Press Democrat file)

 

From the Sonoma County Regional Parks, it’s time for one of their spring traditions – wildflower hikes. I’ve been on a few of these over the years, and they are terrific.

The details:

Discover the spring beauty of your Regional Parks by joining our wildflower walks on Saturdays from March 22-May 3. These walks are free and led by volunteer Phil Dean, a Master Gardner who will identify native plants, discuss the drought’s impact on this year’s flower displays, and share stories specific to the flora of each park. Most walks start at 10 a.m., last about two hours and proceed at an easy pace. The exception is the Hood Mountain outing, which starts at 8 a.m., lasts about four hours, and is a strenuous walk due to the elevation gain. We’ll hike in light rain, but heavy rain cancels. Parking $7 or free for Regional Parks members.

Mar. 22 – Sonoma Valley Regional Park – “Native magic”

Mar. 29 – Steelhead Beach – “Death, spirits, alcohol and other strange plants and tales”

Apr. 5 – Crane Creek Regional Park – “Native magic and cures”

Apr. 12 – Foothill Regional Park – “Fields of color”

Apr. 19 – Riverfront Regional Park – “Alcohol, spirits and fatal beauties”

Apr. 26 – Shiloh Regional Park – “Magical color and ingredients”

May 3 – Hood Mountain Regional Park (Los Alamos Road entrance at 8 a.m.) – “Rare and unusual”


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